Does The Good Friday Agreement Require Regulatory Alignment

The most important document to date regarding Brexit, the hard border and the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) is the joint phase one report of the UK and the EU (8 December 17). In this regard, the UK Government has continued to commit to "avoiding a hard border, including any physical infrastructure or related controls and controls" and, in the absence of "agreed solutions", to "maintain full alignment with the internal market and customs union, which support now or in the future North-South cooperation, the entire island economy and the protection of the 1998 Agreement". The UK Government`s position, which is reflected in the colour-coded version of the draft Withdrawal Agreement, therefore suggests a much more sober assessment of what is needed to fulfil the commitments contained in the Joint Report than was evident in the backlash against the Protocol when it was first published, end of February 2018. the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or Belfast Agreement (in Irish: Comhaontú Aoine à Chéasta or Comhaontú Bhéal Feirste); Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance), [1] is a set of agreements signed on 10 April 1998 that ended most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that had emerged since the late 1960s. . .